Demonstrate familiarity with the major systems for the implementation of human rights and be able to assess the effectiveness of the different systems.

  • Display knowledge of the existence and scope of modern international human rights standards and instruments.
  • Demonstrate familiarity with the major systems for the implementation of human rights and be able to assess the effectiveness of the different systems.
  • Engage with and critique the most important theoretical, academic, and substantive debates in the area of human rights law.
  • Display an awareness of the issues of cultural, religious, and other value systems in both the drafting and application of international human rights standards.
  • Display a detailed knowledge of several of the major substantive rights and the jurisprudence thereon.

Task

“Where, after all, do universal human rights begin? In small places, close to home – so close and so small that they cannot be seen on any maps of the world. Yet they are the world of the individual person; the neighborhood he lives in; the school or college he attends; the factory, farm, or office where he works. Such are the places where every man, woman, and child seeks equal justice, equal opportunity, and equal dignity without discrimination. Unless these rights have meaning there, they have little meaning anywhere. Without concerted citizen action to uphold them close to home, we shall look in vain for progress in the larger world.”