Apply up to date structured techniques to produce analysis and/or design models for a given case study problem

Business Analysis and Modelling

Summary of Assignment

Based on a Case Study, students are expected to draw and discuss: An Analysis Class Diagram, a Communication Diagram, and a Sequence Diagram. Students are also expected to discuss and evaluate the usefulness of UML diagrams and a CASE tool during analysis and design.

Learning Outcome 1: Apply up to date structured techniques to produce analysis and/or design models for a given case study problem

Learning Outcome 2. Have a comprehensive understanding of the role of the systems analyst/ designer, the context in which the systems development activity takes place and the professional standards that are applied to the activity

Assignment Detail - Tasks

Based on the Swift Distribution Ltd. (SDL) Management System (attached as Appendix A), complete the following tasks:

Part 1. Use Case Realisation for the ‘Allocate Truck to Driver` Use Case Analysis Class Diagram

  1. In your own words, briefly describe what is meant by an Analysis Class Diagram, and how class diagrams can be useful in systems analysis and design (max 100 words, +/-10% tolerance).
  2. Draw an Analysis Class Diagram for the ‘Allocate Truck to Driver` Use Case, using the Use Case description given. This should include all required boundary, control and entity classes with their associations and attributes. Your diagram should be drawn using the Enterprise Architect software and copied and inserted as a picture into your document.
  3. Write a brief summary of the decisions made whilst drawing the diagram, and your reasons for making those (max 150 words, +/-10% tolerance).

Communication Diagram

  1. In your own words, briefly describe what is modelled in a Communication Diagram, and how Communication Diagrams can be useful in systems analysis and design (max 100 words, +/-10% tolerance).
  2. Draw a Communication Diagram for the use case in your diagram that corresponds most closely to the use case ‘Allocate Truck to Driver`, using the Use Case description given. This should include all control, boundary and entity objects involved in the scenario and sufficient detail of the messages to show that the interaction is feasible and would meet the system requirements. Your diagram should be drawn using the Enterprise Architect software and copied and inserted as a picture into your document.
  3. Write a brief summary of the decisions made whilst drawing the diagram, and your reasons for making those (max 150 words, +/-10% tolerance).

Part 2. Sequence Diagram

  1. In your own words, briefly describe what is modelled in a Sequence Diagram, and how Sequence Diagrams can be useful in systems analysis and design (max 100 words, +/-10% tolerance).
  2. Draw a Sequence Diagram for the use case in your diagram that corresponds most closely to the use case ‘Allocate Truck to Driver`. This should include all control, boundary and entity objects involved in the scenario and the sequence of interactions that take place in order to meet the system requirements. Your diagram should be drawn using the Enterprise Architect software, and copied and inserted as a picture into your document.
  3. Write a brief summary of the decisions made whilst drawing the diagram, and your reasons for making those (max 150 words, +/-10% tolerance).

Part 3. Evaluation

Enterprise Architect is a CASE tool. In your own words and using examples, briefly describe what a CASE tool offers during analysis of the World-Wide Tours scenario, and what tasks the CASE tool supports. Give your own evaluation of how the role of an analyst/designer is supported by a CASE tool. Discuss how UML modelling supports the analyst/designer (max 750 words, +/-10% tolerance).

The main system tasks are:

  • Requests for delivery services will be received from customers directly on line via the Internet, by telephone or by email. Delivery service requests for HECO are received by connecting to the HECO server system and executing a download of the necessary collection/delivery details for the various consignments. Requests via the Internet result in the direct creation of the delivery job record, but for orders received by telephone, by email or by download, a delivery job record has to be created separately. Where a customer making the request is new to SDL then a customer record has to be created (this is done directly through Internet requests).
  • Customers that are registered for online access to the system may identify a particular delivery job from their records and track the whereabouts of that parcel. This will show its current status e.g. awaiting collection, on truck in transit etc.
  • The payment method for delivery services varies depending upon the type of customer. For private individual customers credit card details are required to be recorded at the time of the delivery request. The card payment will be processed just prior to collection of the consignment. Business customers will be invoiced weekly. Delivery jobs undertaken for HECO are invoiced weekly directly to HECO and not to the independent retailers. An invoice may be for one or more delivery jobs. Once paid, the payment status of each delivery job will be updated.
  • Delivery schedules (i.e. the route for collections/deliveries taken by the truck) are created for each truck for each day using the address information from the delivery job records. A request for a collection may be incorporated into an existing schedule once the driver has started on the route provided that it can easily be included without too great a disruption to the driver`s schedule. This is achieved by locating a truck nearest to the pick-up point and depending upon subsequent stopping points, modifying the schedule to include that call. Route changes will be transmitted to the driver`s handheld device which they will also use to acknowledge its receipt. Where routes cannot be easily changed in this way, the job will be incorporated into a schedule for the following day.
  • At the start of each day a driver will be handed their delivery schedule. Just immediately prior to the start of their journey they will use their handheld device to set the start of the driving period. The will also set the end of the driving period when they finish deliveries. The same mechanism is used to record breaks taken during the day. The fleet manager will check that these times match the odometer record in order to ensure legal compliance. The handheld devices are used by the driver to record collection of jobs and also to record job deliveries. The latter will require a customer signature recorded electronically on the device.
  • A maintenance record is kept for each truck which contains the date/type (including MOT) of its next service; weekly check date; road tax expiry date; and details of any reported faults and subsequent repairs.
  • Drivers like to use the same truck when they can so a truck will be "allocated" to a specific driver.

However, when a vehicle is off the road for repair/service a different truck will be allocated to that driver. Similarly, when a driver is on holiday then that truck may be allocated to a different driver in the interim.